My title
How Coronavirus may affect your policy | Can I claim? Find out more

Halloween Around The World

  • Published on

It’s nearly that time again. That time of year when we all go out of our way to scare each other and celebrate the horrible and macabre with our witches and webs and severed fingers… not to mention the chocolate!

Halloween Around The World

Although many of the Halloween traditions are similar, different countries sometimes celebrate them in other ways. Here are just a few examples of how other countries celebrate and mark the time of year.

Ireland

In Ireland, which is considered to be where Halloween started, the day is still celebrated much like it is in the United States.

In rural areas, bonfires are lit as they were centuries ago, and all over the country, children get dressed up in costumes and spend the evening “trick-or-treating” in their neighborhoods. After trick-or-treating, most people attend parties with neighbors and friends. At the parties, many games are played, including “snap-apple,” a game in which an apple on a string is tied to a doorframe or tree and players attempt to bite the hanging apple.

In addition to bobbing for apples, parents often arrange treasure hunts, with candy or pastries as the “treasure.” The Irish also play a card game where cards are laid face down on a table with candy or coins underneath them. When a child chooses a card, he receives whatever prize is found below it.

A traditional food eaten on Halloween is barnbrack, a kind of fruitcake that can be bought in stores or baked at home. A muslin-wrapped treat is baked inside the cake that, it is said, can foretell the eater’s future. If a ring is found, it means that the person will soon be wed; a piece of straw means that a prosperous year is on its way. Children are also known to play tricks on their neighbors, such as “knock-a-dolly,” a prank in which children knock on the doors of their neighbors, but run away before the door is opened.

from pumpkinpatchesandmore.org

China

In China, the Halloween festival is known as Teng Chieh. Food and water are placed in front of photographs of family members who have departed while bondires and lanterns are lit in order to light the paths of the spirits as they travel the earth on Haloween night.

Worshippers in Buddhist temples fashion “boats of the law” from paper, some of which are very large, which are then burned in the evening hours. The purpose of this custom is twofold: as a remembrance of the dead and in order to free the spirits of the “pretas” in order that they might ascend to heaven.

“Pretas” are the spirits of those who died as a result of an accident or drowning and whose bodies were consequently never buried. The presence of “pretas” among the living is thought by the Chinese to be dangerous. Under the guidance of Buddhist temples, societies are formed to carry out ceremonies for the “pretas,” which includes the lighting of lanterns. Monks are invited to recite sacred verses and offerings of fruit are presented.

from novareinna.com

Mexico

In Mexico, Latin America and Spain, All Souls’ Day or Dia De Los Muertos, which takes place on November 2, is commemorated with a three-day celebration that begins on the evening of October 31. The celebration is designed to honor the dead who, it is believed, return to their earthly homes on Halloween. Many families construct an altar to the dead in their homes to honor deceased relatives and decorate it with candy, flowers, photographs, samples of the deceased’s favorite foods and drinks, and fresh water. Often, a wash basin and towel are left out so that the spirit can wash before indulging in the feast.

Candles and incense are burned to help the deceased find the way home. Relatives also tidy the gravesites of their departed family members. This can include snipping weeds, making repairs, and painting. The grave is then decorated with flowers, wreaths, or paper streamers. On November 2, relatives gather at the gravesite to picnic and reminisce. Some gatherings even include tequila and a mariachi band.

from history.com

Germany

In Germany, Halloween is celebrated as All Saints Day. In southern Germany, it’s celebrated from October 30 to November 8. Typically, in this and many other Catholic parts of the world, the All Saints Day is spent attending church, honoring the saints who have died for the Catholic faith, as well as visiting and remembering dead family members, usually graveside.

Additionally, Germans hide their knives, so the returning spirits presumably won’t get harmed by random knife movements during the day.

from travelchannel.com

Austria

A Halloween tradition in Austria involves bread, water and a lighted lamp. Some of the locals will leave bread, water and a lighted lamp on the table before retiring on Halloween night.

Considered a magical night, Halloween to Austrians was a way to welcome the dead souls back to earth.

from wsaw.com

How do other countries around the world celebrate Halloween

Auther
ERV On Air

ERV On Air

Recent posts
Yoga and back problems

Back problems and travel insurance

Back problems can be a real pain and will affect most people...

Travelling with Arthritis

According to the NHS, there are around 10 million people in ...

Hypertension/High Blood Pressure

Travel insurance for high blood pressure. According to the N...

I was very impressed by the level of service.

They beat the competition by a country mile! Super happy and will most certainly be buying insurance with them again.

ERGO Customer - December 2019